Wrightwood’s Heath Creek – Quiet Portal into Forest Trees

Hike Details for   –    WRIGHTWOOD’S HEATH CREEK

Distance and elevation gain / loss:  Approximately one mile (one way) with 400′ of elevation gain.

Follow the gated dirt road that runs atop levee on north side of Heath Creek stream bed.

Hike begins on Thrush Rd, just east of the tee intersection with Victorville St.  Walk up the dirt road  just west of Heath Creek bridge.  There’s a silver colored pipe gate just a short distance above Thrush.

Looking toward the desert on the levee road. This spot is about half-way between the lower and upper pipe gates.

One of the major canyons dropping into Wrightwood’s Swarthout Valley is Heath Creek.  It’s the canyon that begins as the large, conspicuous slide on Wright Mountain’s north side.  The slide, dropping straight down from the summit is especially prominent from downtown Wrightwood.  If you’re outside the post office or Mountain Hardware and looking southward, there’s a really good view of the slide, with Wright Mountain’s pine covered summit just to the left of it (elev. 8,505′).  The canyon is named after Harry Heath who homesteaded the east end of the Swarthout Valley, near present day Pacific Crest Estates,  back in 1886.   Back then, Heath Ranch (circa 1900-1919) had a dairy, as well as boasting an orchard of apple and pear trees irrigated with water conveyed from a stream intake in the watercourse that today bears his name.

Outline of the former Heath Ranch. Purchased from Sumner Wright in 1902, Harry Heath received his deed for the land in 1910. You can see that some of Heath’s most suitable ranch land was in the area now known as Pacific Crest Estates. Oddly, his 160 acres do not extend to the watershed that bears his name. Map image courtesy of Wrightwood Historical Society.

Pat Krig, a long-time Wrightwood pioneer and historian, wrote down some notes about the Heath Ranch which she visited on horseback as a young girl.  The Wrightwood Historical Society generously provided me a copy of her notes from 2006 which portrays what little is known of Harry Heath’s ranch.  Unfortunately, there were no photos of either Heath or his ranch.   One paragraph in Pat’s reminiscences that in particular stood out to me, was this: “A few of the gnarled apple trees still stand, bearing fruit and bringing memories of hot apple pies for tired travelers, and offers of a pitcher of fresh milk, thick cream for coffee, and butter to spread on warm, fragrant bread then slathered with pumpkin butter.”  Pat wrote this back in 2006.  Sadly, Pat passed away just this last year, taking with her memories of an earlier time in the mountains that we can only faintly imagine.

Last year’s dried flower stalks still draw your attention to clumps of buckwheat growing along Heath Creek.

Pearl Comfort Fisher, who wrote “The Mountaineers” back in 1972, provides a brief glimpse into a cowboy’s visit to the Heath Ranch back in 1907.  The cowboy was Harvey Cheesman, hired to round up stray cattle from the nearby Lovejoy Springs Ranch.  “So it happened that as I came over the divide from Lone Pine Canyon one cold February late afternoon I found the ranch or homestead of Harry Heath at the head of Sheep Creek.  Upon knocking at the door I was met by a lady with a small baby in her arms.  It was Mrs. Heath.  She said, “‘My, am I glad to see some one.  A mountain lion has been prowling around here for three nights and my husband is away working, and I am afraid the lion will get some of our pigs and chickens.  “No lion showed up that night and I had to go on my way the next day.”

Today, it’s hard to imagine Wrightwood as wild and isolated as it must have been 112 years ago.   The upper half of this hike will give you a taste of a quieter more forested Swarthout Valley.

Here’s a small section of the Wrightwood – Big Pines map depicting part of Heath Creek. Access this hike by taking the dirt road that departs south, climbing upslope from Thrush Rd. between Victorville Street and Heath Creek Rd.

This walk is a great one if you just have a little time, say less than an hour and you’d like to get some hill climbing in, too.   You’re walking on a flood control levee road.  The beginning of your trip is a bit exposed to the sun and completely devoid of trees, much of the landscape down in the wash to your left has a sterile, bleak look due to constant grading from county bulldozers.   Not that great at first. . .   Hang in there,  the bleakness soon ends.  Your route soon encounters black oaks, Jeffrey and Ponderosa pines on both sides of the levee road.  An enticing flat makes its’ presence across the stream on your left.  On your right is a gentle, expansive alluvial slope covered in a healthy pine forest.  Mostly private, undeveloped land, this terrain gives you a sense of what Wrightwood must have been like in the 19th century.   On a warm day, the air is fragrant with pine and amazingly quiet, save the occasional song bird or acorn woodpecker tapping high above the forest floor.

Trailhead for the Heath Creek hike is where Thrush crosses Heath Canyon.  Thrush is the straight, east-west trending road just above (north) the “n” in Canyon.  Notice that this U.S.G.S. topographic map section still shows Lone Pine Canyon Road crossing Heath Canyon, as it once did prior to the 1969 flood.

After a mile, you’ll encounter another silver painted pipe gate.  This is your turnaround point.  If you have the time, continue further up along the road to a set of four wooden benches set in a square configuration.  Walk on past this gathering area, bearing left and staying with the canyon bottom.  Follow a deeply eroded trace of a former jeep road.  Essentially now a trail, continue on up the canyon for another 400′ feet of elevation to the trail’s end on a rocky berm above the stream bed.  You will also see a little frame structure made from lashed together cedar trunks and limbs.

Snowshoe Wrightwood’s Table Mountain

9,399′ high Mt. Baden-Powell’s massif dominates the southwest skyline from Table Mountain.

Joanie and I got out for a great afternoon of snowshoeing up on Wrightwood’s Table Mountain about a week and a half ago.   Since then,  more storms have dropped even more of the precious powder on our local mountains.   Whether you like to cross-country ski or snowshoe, it’s a fantastic time to be out amongst our high country peaks, canyons and forests!

Inset of the Trails of Wrightwood – Big Pines map. The area we went snowshoeing is depicted as Table Mountain (with campground symbol) at an elevation of 7,200′. The west end of Wrightwood appears in the lower right corner of image.

Table Mountain is 7,516′ high and super easy to get to from Wrightwood.  Just drive.  You’re only looking at four miles from our village center.  Make sure to turn off to the right on Table Mountain Road when you arrive at the three way split in the roads at Big Pines.  Table Mountain Campground is where we did our snowshoeing on a quiet Friday, where we seemed to have the place to ourselves.  The wind had sculpted the snow into pristine dunes along the gently sloping ridge top that the extensive campground straddles.

Joanie seems to almost float atop the powder on the sunny slopes of Table Mountain!

All the campsites were, of course, hidden under the snowy mantle, with just the picnic tabletops presenting themselves as a bit of a depth gauge.  Most of the time, snow depth was around 24″ and in places well over three feet.  The windward sides of the mammoth white fir and Ponderosas were coated in sparkling icicles that fell like shards of glass in the wind gusts that came out of the southwest.  Mt. Baden-Powell kept constant watch over us from across the great gulf of the East Fork of the San Gabriel River.   The Mojave Desert off to the north was a mosaic of tans, yellow sands and the right-angled patchwork of green winter crops scattered here and there.  It looked and felt warmer down there.  And high up on Table Mountain, that day was to be one of cobalt blue skies, bright white snows, wind and evergreens.

A small wind-bent snowy pine and Chris have a little visit amongst Table Mountain’s frozen forest.

 

 

 

Big Santa Anita Canyon – High Water

A view of 55′ high Sturtevant Falls as taken from the Upper Falls Trail this last Saturday. The stream crossings are so high right now that wading seems the best way to get across.

Our epic winter continues, with Sturtevant Falls looking more beautiful than ever.  Last weekend our rain gauge had overflowed from the accumulation of a couple more storms before we could hike back in and check it.  The gauge holds 12″ of rain before it overflows, so this tells something about the rains this month.

Looking downstream at Fern Lodge Junction. The stream is swollen, cold and flowing with energy.

Big Santa Anita Creek Comes Alive After Recent Storms

Looking across at Sturtevant Falls and plunge pool from the Upper Falls Trail.

Big Santa Anita Creek comes alive after recent storms.  55′ high Sturtevant Falls is back in its’ former glory as well!   As we all know, years of drought have taken their toll throughout the southwest, especially in the myriad of canyons throughout the mountains of Southern California.

Joanie and I discovered 9.57″ of rain in our gauge at Fern Lodge on January 18th.  Several storms, back to back, have made a huge difference in the appearance of not only the Big Santa Anita creek, but all the rest of the front country streams in the Angeles.   A week later, we hiked up and past Sturtevant Falls where we took these two photos.

This view taken just above Sturtevant Falls. This is at the top of the slot pools.

As of today, February 10th, a lot more rain has fallen.  The stream beds have been scoured of the dark organic mat that’s built up for years.  This has left bright, colorful sands and rocks under the clear waters.  Beautiful.

A tranquil stretch of the Big Santa Anita Creek in the Fern Lodge area of the canyon. This spot is near the little cabin village where the Upper Falls and Gabrielino trails depart the canyon bottom.

Wrightwood’s Heath Creek – Snow Shoe it!

Yesterday, I headed up Heath Creek and got a quick snowshoe in to the upper gate.  Only went about a mile up from Thrush Rd.  However, it’s about 460′ of gain.  It’s been so long since we’ve had this kind of snow.  Forgot how much of a chug it would be with snowshoes on – ha!   Good times.

Here’s a small section of the Wrightwood – Big Pines map depicting part of Heath Creek. Access this hike by taking the dirt road that departs south, climbing upslope from Thrush Rd. between Victorville Street and Heath Creek Rd.

Elevation Gain / Loss:

From the lower gate (just above Thrush Rd.) to upper gate = 460′.       The elevation on Thrush Rd. at spot where you walk up the beginning of levee road is 5,840′.   This gain takes place in approximately one mile along the levee road located on west side of Heath Creek.   Elevation of upper gate is 6,300′.

If you have time, keep on going past the upper gate.  Soon you’ll encounter some sawn log benches placed in a square configuration.   Keep going further up along the stream bed on the old, steeply rutted jeep road which is in places barely a trace.  It’s steeper going now than it was on the levee road between the two gates.

From upper gate to top end of old jeep road (abandoned)    =400′.  The top end of old road is where two canyons come together. There’s a forested canyon on the left side and small stream running between jagged walls on the right.  The elevation here is 6,700′.     Look for the little framework of limbs that have been lashed to some upright hand-hewn cedar poles.

Looking directly up Wright Mountain’s slide from the canyon bottom. This is the same slide you can view toward the south from the Wrightwood Post Office. Wright Mountain’s summit is at top of ridge on far left of photo at an elevation of 8,500′. Photo was taken at elevation of 6,300′ near upper gate.
Today, finally dragged out the dusty snow shoes!
Looking over my shoulder, this is all that’s being left behind.
Heath Creek, looking down canyon. That’s the Mojave Desert on the distant skyline.
Snow covered mountain mahogany, Heath Creek.
Snow bent Great Basin Sagebrush about a mile up Heath Canyon from Thrush Rd.
This little structure of lashed together branches and poles is up at the end of the hike. It’s up above the rocky stream bed at confluence of the two canyons.

Chilao Flat, Hiking the Silver Moccasin Trail

Joanie graces the Silver Moccasin Trail sign at Chilao. This is the view looking south back toward Chantry Flats.

Last Wednesday, my wife Joanie and I headed west for 33 miles on Highway 2 from our home in Wrightwood to Chilao.   Also known as Chilao Flat,  this gently rolling terrain of forest trees is located about midway between La Canada and Wrightwood on the scenic and diverse Angeles Crest Highway 2.    Chilao  has a U.S. Forest Service fire station that is home to the Chilao Hot Shot firefighters.  There is a beautiful visitor center staffed by volunteers (usually open on the weekends) along with the carefully relocated and restored West Fork Guard Station built by the turn-of-the-century ranger Louis Newcomb in 1900.  There are scores of places to car camp, both for groups as well as individual campsites available on a “first come – first serve” basis.  Many of the campsites, such as those of the Little Pines Loop, have piped water as well.  If you’re looking for a place to have a meal, a cold beer or just to rub elbows with lots, and I mean lots of motorcycle riders and sports cars owners, make sure to stop at Newcomb’s Ranch Inn, just a few hundred yards up Highway 2 from the upper Chilao entrance.   The experience is the opposite of hiking,  yet worth experiencing if you have the time.

Detail of the U.S.G.S. Chilao Flat quadrangle, 1995 edition. Our route from Chilao Creek to Little Pines Loop via the Silver Moccasin Trail. Little Pines Loop is in the spot on map labeled as “Water Tank” just to left, northwest, of Highway 2.

Joanie and I had come to Chilao to hike a small section of the Silver Moccasin Trail.  We parked about 3/4 of a mile down the quiet paved lane from the visitor center at a point where the trail crosses the road. In the sun, it was pretty hot, yet under the canopies of the tall incense cedars, Ponderosa and Jeffrey pines, a gentle breeze kept us cool and comfortable.  We decided to head south, toward the Little Pines Campground Loop about a mile away.  Our friend Kevin, the ranger at Chantry Flats had written us the good news that there was still water at Little Pines, a fact that would make things extremely convenient for a backpack trip I was about to go on with a couple of friends in mid September.  We’re going to be hiking from Sierra Madre to Wrightwood,  with much of the route on the Silver Moccasin (established in 1942 by the Boy Scouts of America) and also the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT) over the course of six days.  Little Pines will be the second night out on the trail.  This time of year, there are days on the hike where you can expect up to ten miles between any water at all.  Joanie and I wanted to see how the trail approached and left the campground.  Also, it was just a great excuse for hiking through the gently sloping and forested terrain of Chilao Flat in the middle of the

Stopping to admire one of the stately incense cedars found at Chilao. Silver Moccasin Trail.

San Gabriel mountains.

We immediately crossed the sandy wash of Chilao Creek wading our way through wild grasses, following the trail through glades of pine, cedar and sage.  Eventually, we climbed up a small draw in the hillside, passing under Big Cone Spruce and alongside remnant burned trees from the 2009 Station Fire.  We made our way up and over a ridge top that was baking out in the sun.  Hills in the distance  still held onto the upright skeletons of burned out pines and spruce from that enormous conflagration from nine years ago.  In the distance it still looked bleak.  Poodle dog bush and other chaparral plants filled in the rest of the scenery under the relentless August sunshine.  Soon we made our way down another draw and into the pine covered coolness just outside Little Pines Campground.   We found a spigot out in the hot sun, still attached to a burned post at one of the campsites.  I turned the handle and the blessed liquid gold poured forth.  Beyond good.

Joanie approaching Chilao Creek on the Silver Moccasin Trail.

Shade was the thing we needed right now!  After a quick look at some of the campsites, we found a spot out from the sun, eating and drinking while sitting on wood chip covered ground.   We walked back the way we had come.    The air was quiet and peppered with the scent of pines, cedar and sage.  Peace and tranquility reigned.  Once, again, the mountains had delivered.

 

Sturtevant Falls is Flowing at it’s peak level for Spring

Sturtevant Falls as seen from the Upper Falls Trail on Sunday. Despite the fairly dry winter season, recent rains brought us nearly three more inches of rain, bringing up the levels of the stream.

Sturtevant Falls is flowing at it’s peak level for Spring.  This photo was taken while hiking on the Upper Falls Trail this last Sunday.  The rain gauge at our cabin in the Fern Lodge area recorded 2.92″ from the recent storm.  The stream’s nice and full, it’s song filling the canyon from wall to wall.   Many of the pools in the canyon have received a cleansing scouring.  Dark organics that build up over the year on the stream bed have finally been washed clean out of the sand.   This is a great time to take a hike at Chantry Flats in the Big Santa Anita Canyon!   Fern beds on the steep slopes and cliffs are growing in their thick greenery.  Sturtevant Falls is definitely one of the most sought after places to visit during the spring hiking season.  If at all possible, try to get in a hike to the falls during the week days due to the parking congestion at the trailhead.

The hike in is less than two miles one way, rated as “easy” in John W. Robinson’s Trails of the Angeles.  Begin your hike at the Gabrielino trailhead, located adjacent to the lower parking lot at Chantry Flats.  Descend over 400′ to the canyon bottom in less than 3/4 of a mile.  Cross the foot bridge at Roberts’ Camp, then follow the dirt road upstream, passing by the little cabins built over a hundred years ago.  The road soon peters out, your route becoming single-track off and on until you reach the base of the falls.  Return the way you came.

 

 

Lightning Ridge Nature Trail – Wrightwood, CA

Posted on May 1, 2017 – Written by Chris Kasten

The northwest side of Mount Baldy as seen from the Lightning Ridge Nature Trail ( summit is between the two pines in foreground). To the left of Mt. Baldy is Pine Mountain. It too, still has some snow on its’ slopes. Mount Baldy, officially known as Mount San Antonio, is the highest peak in the San Gabriel mountains at 10,064′ elevation.  That’s the Angeles Crest Highway (Hwy. 2) coming up from the mountain village of Wrightwood on the left side of photograph.

Now that it’s May and the days have started to warm up and lengthen,  consider walking the Lightning Ridge Nature Trail.  It’s up 7,300′ on the spine of the San Gabriel mountains.  This is high country with fabulous views in all directions.  A short drive west of Wrightwood, approximately 5 miles, takes you to the trailhead just across Hwy. 2 (Angeles Crest Highway) from Inspiration Point.

Colorful lichens make these wind swept boulders their home atop the San Gabriel mountains. Elevation is 7,400′ on an exposed ridge top.  Lightning Ridge Nature Trail – Wrightwood, CA.

The trailhead is on the north side of Hwy. 2 in a wide turnout next to a backdrop of willows and shrubs.  There’s a red metal picnic table there as well.  Find your way through the little brushy opening and you’ll see a PCT (Pacific Crest Trail) signpost marking the trail to your left.  You’ll take the trail directly in front of you, contouring the gentle slope.  Sometimes you’ll find leaflets in the covered metal box at the trail’s beginning that describe the flora along the way.  Whether you find them or not, there’s plenty to ponder and take in without knowing the names of all the plants along the way.  This loop trail is only a bit over half a mile in length, climbs about a hundred feet from the start and perfect for all ages and abilities.  The Lightning Ridge Nature Trail travels underneath mature Jeffrey pines and black oaks, at times switchbacking amongst whitethorn chaparral (buckthorn) and even ascending the slope by means of steps made of landscape timbers.  Over the years, our family has often used these steps as little seats to look out over the nearby desert with its’ ever-changing palette of color and shadow.  One of the unique qualities of this loop trail is the constant grand views of the Mojave Desert to the north, Mount Baden-Powell toward the west, the open canyon country of the East Fork of the San Gabriel River to the south and, of course, Pine Mountain, Dawson Peak and Old Baldy to the east.

A view of the beginning of the Lightning Ridge Nature Trail. This short loop trail is a wonderful introduction for all ages into the landscape and flora of the San Gabriel mountains high country.

As the trail circles back in on itself and joins the PCT for the return, take a little time to rest on the overlook bench, taking in the fine views of canyons and peaks.  Much of the Sheep Mountain Wilderness area is directly out front of you from this ridge top perch.  One of the range’s most isolated and challenging peaks, Iron Mountain (elevation 8,008′), can be seen straight out to the south at the end of lonesome West San Antonio Ridge, which comes off of Mt. Baldy to it’s right (west).  Iron Mountain’s nipple shaped summit is easy to identify from this vantage point.  When you’re ready, return back to the beginning by way of the PCT.  You’ll pass by fallen giant tree trunks, bleached smooth by the high elevation sun and wind.  A great trail to experience at sunset!

Big Pines Nature Trail – Wrightwood, CA

Posted on April 19, 2017 – Written by Chris Kasten

Close up of plate-like tree bark on Ponderosa Pine. The Big Pines Nature Trail travels among mature stands of Jeffrey and Ponderosa pines. The north-facing forested slope of Blue Ridge is off to the right.

Just went up to the Big Pines Nature Trail last week.  It was late in the day and thick, gold light was drifting down through the pines and slopes.  Located just three miles west of Wrightwood, this is a convenient spot to walk a gentle, half-mile loop up amongst some

Looking out at Wright Mountain on the far east end of Blue Ridge. Mature stands of Ponderosa and Jeffrey pine are in the foreground.

really large pines along with fine views of thickly forested Blue Ridge.  The trail starts next to the old Big Pines Lodge.  Look for a little parking lot on the north side of Highway 2, just before passing the old Big Pines Lodge.  You start your loop hike by walking up a flight of beautiful stone stairs built back when Big Pines was developed as the jewel of the Los Angeles County parks.  These stairs were tread upon by visitors to this mountain wonderland of four seasons.  Not only was there a lodge here for dances, movies, plays and replete with fireplaces, but there were housekeeping cabins, a place to dine, sled runs, ice skating, camping, swimming and even a little zoo.  Back then, the Angeles Crest Highway had not yet been finished, so one drove here from

North Tower. This is what remains of Davidson Arch, built back in 1926. The arch spanned the highway, providing a pedestrian overpass for the many visitors to Big Pines. The arch was torn down in 1950 to accommodate the widening of the highway.

the desert side on County Route

N4 or up from Cajon Canyon by way of Lone Pine Canyon Road through Wrightwood.  No freeways. The San Gabriel Mountains have always held an allure for people seeking beauty and peace.  It’s no different today, and although the times and works of man pass slowly by, the beauty of these mountains remains.  An easy walk for all ages, this self-guided nature trail does about a hundred feet of gain in just over a half mile before returning back down to its’ beginning.  There are signs along the path that point out the native plants along the way.  The slope you travel is south-facing and receives good light

This benchmark, placed next to where the north tower of Davidson Arch is located, marks your elevation at 6,861 feet above sea level. As you can see, it was placed here 93 years ago by the surveyors!

and even in the winter and early spring can still be comfortably warm while snow still clings to the north slopes of Blue Ridge.  Because of this slope’s southerly aspect, you’ll find sun loving plants such as Yerba Santa, Parry’s Manzanita and Fremontia (flannel bush) to name a few.  Yet, you’ll still enjoy the welcome shade of Ponderosa, Jeffrey pine and leafy black oaks (Kellogg). There are some good spots to sit down and rest awhile and think about nothing.  Upon your return, don’t forget to poke your head into the door of the visitor center, located on far right side of the porch of the old Big Pines Lodge.  Presently, the center is staffed by the U.S. Forest Service Friday through Tuesday, providing information on local places to visit and hike.

Blue Ridge Trail Hike in Wrightwood, CA

Posted on April 9, 2017 – Written by Chris Kasten

Looking down into Sawmill Canyon while descending the Blue Ridge Trail. Photo taken just below Blue Ridge Campground. That’s Pinyon Ridge out in the distance.

It’s already far enough into the Spring to do the Blue Ridge Trail hike in Wrightwood, CA.  Yesterday, Joanie and I worked our way up the Blue Ridge Trail, which begins across the street from the old Big Pines Lodge just a few miles west of Wrightwood.   The air was fresh (mid 40′s) as shredded white clouds blew fast to the north over Blue Ridge.  The Blue Ridge Trail is 2 miles in length and climbs about 1,100′ between Big Pines and Blue Ridge Campground.  This trail hike is a pleasant climb, in many places contouring shaded slopes and occasionally poking into quiet little side canyons filled with willows.  Much of the view is of the Swarthout Valley which cradles the little mountain village of Wrightwood.

Half way up the mountainside is a wooden bench that performs double-duty as both a place to sit as well as a trail sign.  The recessed lettering indicates that Blue Ridge Campground is one mile up and Big Pines one mile down.   The trail continues on,  contouring and climbing the mountainside above Sawmill Canyon.  Eventually, the trail switchbacks just prior to reaching Blue Ridge Campground, a pretty little spot with eight campsites straddling piney Blue Ridge.   The Pacific Crest Trail, spanning from the

A section of the Trails of Wrightwood – Big Pines map is being oriented to the local landscape. This photo was taken on the lower end of the Blue Ridge Trail between Big Pines and Blue Ridge Campground.Mexican border all the way to Canada,  is also met here at the campground.

Mexico border all the way to Canada passes through the campground.

You can return back down the mountainside, the same way you came up, or make a loop out of it by taking the PCT (Pacific Crest Trail) toward Inspiration Point and then cutting off onto a dirt access road which descends back toward Mountain High West ski area.  This route can be seen on both the Trails of Wrightwood – Big Pines map or Tom Harrison’s Angeles High Country map.

Regardless of which way you do your return trip, you’re sure to enjoy passing through healthy and mature stands of black oak, jeffrey pine, ponderosa pine, sugar pine and white fir.

Morning light on flowering lupine. Photo taken about midway between Big Pines and Blue Ridge Campground.